Tutorials Getting Started The Basics of Measurement Tools

The Basics of Measurement Tools

Reading Time: 6 minutes

Estimated reading time: 11 minutes | Target users: New users

An extensive number of measurement tools are available in VCC Live® Desk. They allow you to quickly get an insight into your projects, resources, and user activities.

In this lesson, you will learn:

  • What a measurement tool is
  • What type of measurement tools there are
  • Which tools you should get started with

What is a Measurment Tool?

Operating a contact center business of any size is a complex task. Agents often handle hundreds of queries on a daily basis via a number of different channels. And supervisors, as well as making sure daily workloads are divided equally, also need to focus on long-term planning, such as clarifying the number of agents needed in order to run the business smoothly.

As a result, supervisors and managers are required to process a large amount of data. Measurement tools help with this activity by making it quick and easy to collect and present relevant data.

Type of Measurement Tools

There are 3 types of measurements tools:

  • Logs provide detailed records of calls, chat conversations, emails, text messages, and users’ activities and status. Details include the duration, source, target, timestamp, outcome, and content of communication activities, as well as what tasks users carry out, how much time they spend working or on a break, and more.

  • Monitoring enables you to get an insight into daily operations in real time. Users can observe and check the progress, quality, and quantity of inbound and outbound calls, as well as track current changes in, for example, survey projects.

  • Statistics present quantitative data regarding changes related to the database, dispositions used, and calls over a period of time.

In addition, we also distinguish measurement tools based on their scope. Global measurement tools represent data for all your projects, while project-specific measurement tools show data specific to a chosen project.

Tools to Get Started With

Having this many logs, monitoring, and statistics tools may seem overwhelming at first. That is why we recommend you get acquainted with the most important ones first: CDR Logs and Inbound Statistics.

Tip: If you want to take a look at every available measurement tool, see Logs, Monitoring and Statistics.

Getting Started with CDR Log

The CDR (Call Detail Record) log lists all records generated in a specific project for a specific period. It allows you to see the direction of the call, the caller and called contact’s name, call time and duration, whether the call was terminated or rejected, the different states of the entire call including their duration, and much more. You can also download and listen to call recordings. The CDR log is a project-specific measurement tool.

Let’s start with opening the CDR Log worksheet.

  1. Select a project from the project list, then select Logs and statistics > CDR log.
  2. Set the time period you need the log for.
  3. Press Search to get the results.

A lot of data is presented in various columns. But what columns should you look at? Let’s go through the most important columns. If there is a column you cannot see, you can add or remove additional ones by using the Column selection icon button.

Column Explanation
Listen Play icon Hover your mouse over a record, then press Play icon to listen to the call recording.
Download Download icon Hover your mouse over a record, then press Download icon to download the call recording.
Source Caller phone number. Zero means hidden callerID.
Destination Called phone number.
Direction Direction of the call: inbound or outbound.
Start/answer time Timestamp for the start of the conversation involving an agent.
Ring time The time which elapses between when the call is initiated, and when it is answered.
Talk time Lenght of the conversation. Zero means an unanswered call.
Time in queue The time which elapses between the client reaching the queue, and an agent answering the call (or the client ending the call).
Afterwork The time which elapses between when a call is hung up and when a disposition is saved. Zero means the disposition was selected before hang up, or there was no call.
Disposition Disposition allocated to the record.

Getting Started with Inbound Statistics

Inbound statistics shows details of your inbound calls, including SLA (time allowed for answering calls), total number of calls, currently queuing calls, and more. There are both global and project-specific inbound statistics.

Let’s open the global inbound statistics worksheet. Global measurement tools are available via the VCC Live® menu.

  1. From the VCC Live® menu, select Logs and statistics > Global inbound statistics.
  2. Set the time period you need the statistics for.
  3. Press Search to get the results.

Now let’s open the the project-specific inbound statistics worksheet. Project-specific measurement tools can be accessed in the project settings.

  1. Select a project from the project list, then select Logs and statistics > Inbound statistics.
  2. Set the time interval you need the statistics for.
  3. Press Search to get the results.

The inbound statistics has plenty of data to show off as well. Let’s go through the most important columns.

Column Explanation
SLA Service-level agreement. Formula: (Picked up in time + Disconnected in queue) / Total calls reached the queue.
Total calls Sum of all inbound calls.
In queue Calls which reached the queue and were picked up.
Picked up in time (SLA) Picked up within the SLA value set. Default value: 30 seconds. You can modify the SLA value. See To Set SLA Time.
Picked up in time (%) Formula: Picked up within the SLA value / In queue.
Picked up after limit (SLA) Call answered beyond the SLA value.
Answered after time (%) Formula: Picked up beyond the SLA value / In queue.
Disconnected in queue Call disconnected in queue within the SLA value.
Disconnected in queue (%) Formula: Disconnected in queue / In queue.
Disconnected after queue SLA limit Disconnected in queue, beyond the SLA value.
Disconnected after queue SLA limit (%) Formula: Disconnected beyond the queue SLA value / In queue.
Time in queue The time which elapses between the client reaching a queue, and an agent answering the call.
Average time in queue Formula: Time in queue / In queue. Time in queue is the total time for all calls from the moment the queue was reached.
Talktime Conversation length. Zero means unanswered call.
Average talktime Formula: Talk time / Answered in time + Answered beyond time.

There are no comments yet.
Subscribe to our newsletter
or Contact us!
Please note that by subscribing to our newsletter, you agree to receive regular email messages from VCC Live® about service related news and updates. By subscribing to our newsletter, you also agree that VCC Live® will use your data in accordance with the applicable Privacy Policy until you unsubscribe from the newsletter.